offbeat things to do in Jammu and Kashmir, things to do in Kashmir, Snowman, Hamam, Craftsmen in Kashmir, Water Skiing, Tajjis at Khayam chowk, Tajjis, Snow scooter in Kashmir, Rafting in Kashmir, Snow fighting in Kashmir, Homestays in Kashmir, visit Jammu and Kashmir

Visiting Jammu and Kashmir? Do a Little Extra

offbeat things to do in Jammu and Kashmir, things to do in Kashmir, Snowman, Hamam, Craftsmen in Kashmir, Water Skiing, Tajjis at Khayam chowk, Tajjis, Snow scooter in Kashmir, Rafting in Kashmir, Snow fighting in Kashmir, Homestays in Kashmir, visit Jammu and Kashmir

 

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I – I took the one less traveled by”, you really concentrated in school if you recognize these lines from Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken”(https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44272/the-road-not-taken). Frost, in his poem, has beautifully described that one might enjoy what has once been experienced by another; but to discover something new is to truly realize the enigma of nature. The choice to be different, the choice to explore a different perspective is what brings joy and peace to mind.

But then, why does my title narrate something that is experienced by someone else? Because a little guidance never hurt anyone, and hearing to experiences generate curiosity to discover more of such hidden treasures. And what better place to explore at than the serene, mystical and wide fields of Jammu and Kashmir?

So, here is a photo grid of ecstasies wrapped in awe that introduces you to some offbeat things that one can do in Jammu and Kashmir.

 

  1. Choose Homestays with Kashmiri Families and learn about the real Kashmir, accompanied by delicious native food delicacies.

 

  1. Hit a snowball and get hit by many more, there is abundant of it.

 

  1. Beat the cold in Kashmiri Hamam, a place that warms you inside out.

 

  1. Go river rafting in Gulmarg and Sonmarg. Yes, that’s possible!

 

  1. Ride Snow Scooters in Gulmarg, new addition.

 

  1. Eat Tujjis (Barbeques) at Khayam Chowk.

 

  1. Try water skiing in Dal Lake, go desi style.

 

  1. Meet the talented craftsmen of the valley.

 

  1. Revisit your childhood and make a snowman.

 

  1. Visit Gurez Valley, the high Himalayas.

 

 

Well, such lists don’t really have an ending, therefore, I have tried to mention some of the unique things that one can plan to do while visiting Jammu and Kashmir. Hope they help you experience a different side of the Kashmir valley and summer capital Jammu. Also, keep updating us and help us add more enigmas to our list of 10.

 

 

Short- Films and Jammu & Kashmir

Short- Films and Jammu & Kashmir

 

With the rise of Popular Culture in cinemas, literature, music and various forms of art, what can be a better form of expression than the latest trend of Short- Films? Undoubtedly, the most precious attribute of our valley is its multidimensional cultural heritage. The surreal beauty & its creative incarnations, emotions of people and their Kashmiriyat, multiple festivals and its colors need an outlet of expression; and our Kashmiri youngsters have chosen Short- Films to present them.

Short- films have become a significant medium of story-telling in the field of video- making. With a flexible approach these merely 10-30 (approx.)  minutes long films leave a deep impact on their viewers. See how our Kashmiri filmmakers use this popular platform to depict their perspectives on and about Kashmir and try to convey their messages through a realistic depiction of the changing times.

 

Let’s take you down to the list of some of the best filmmakers from the valley who have expressed their emotional & curious experience in Kashmir via their outstanding short- films.

  1. Aamir Wani and Ruman Hamdani’s Kashmir Through My Lens

 

Kashmirthroughmylens, filmakers, short films, short film makers from kashmir

 

Aamir Wani, the silent gem of Kashmir, is a photographer and writer. Kashmir Through My Lens is the depiction of his creative outlook on Kashmir. Through poetry and scenery, Wani has deciphered the most euphoric and enigmatic colors of Kashmir.

Want to have a look yourself, click here

 

  1. Jalal Ud Din Baba’s Saving the Saviour

 

Kashmirthroughmylens, filmakers, short films, short film makers from kashmir

 

Jalal Ud Din Baba is that blessing in disguise for Kashmir that spreads smiles wherever it goes. Saving the Saviours defines his way of sighting inspiration through his stories into people. In the film, a 15- year- old makes a living by cleaning the trash from Wular Lake. The boy becomes an example of strength and positivity.

Watch here 

 

  1. Siddhartha Gigoo’s The Last Day

 

Kashmirthroughmylens, filmakers, short films, short film makers from kashmir

 

Gigoo is a rising novelist and filmmaker, who while studying literature in Delhi exercises his passion of uprooting his experiences as a Kashmiri. The Last Day is a eulogy to those Kashmiri Pandits who lost their home for no good reason. Sad as it is, Kashmir still weeps its loss.

Watch the beautiful depiction here

  1. Hyder Habib’s Firaaq

 

Kashmirthroughmylens, filmakers, short films, short film makers from kashmir

 

Hyder Habib is an aspiring filmmaker who began to make films with a hand full of passion and a bunch of friends. A real struggler, his film Firaaq describes the pain of separation through the journey of a young boy. It instills the essence of belonging in viewers and helps them to realize their emotions towards a person or a place.

Watch Firaaq here 

 

  1. Ruman Hamdani’s Srinagar: Through a Tourist’s Eyes

 

Kashmirthroughmylens, filmakers, short films, short film makers from kashmir

 

There are no limits when it comes to storytelling, but, to put it in the right way, truly, and with utmost justice, is what makes a good story. And we have Hamdani for it. Ruman is not only a versatile filmmaker but also an ace human being. Watch, Srinagar: Through a Tourist’s Eyes, the story of an Italian girl, who was told that her visit to Kashmir would be scary, and to whom Ruman proved wrong. In the end, she could not stop herself from falling in love with the valley and its people.

Watch the journey here 

Of Lost Home and Acceptance: Jammu and Kashmir

Of Lost Home and Acceptance: Jammu and Kashmir

Of Lost Home and Acceptance: Jammu and Kashmir

 

Kashmiri Life is a platform where we look forward to the experiences, memories and wonders of Kashmiri people while living in Jammu and Kashmir. We look on the bright sides of the valley, the emotions attached to its divine beauty and day to day life.

 

But yesterday, we received a tale/poem about belonging for one’s home. The writer was anonymous but quickly perceived as a displaced Kashmiri residing somewhere around the globe. The poem appears to talk about the beginning of dispute in our valley. It talks about the past- its warmth and glory, then the dispute and finally the present residential situation of the writer. And, the acceptance that comes after a long period of 30 years. It carriers the narrative through the medium of a cup, which she/he probably used for having kahwah as a 20 year old. The interpretation is open to all, we perceive what we feel.

 

We preferred to share it for the emotion that it carries, it’s vital to all of us, a unanimous feeling of belongingness to home. Please let us know if you too connect with it.

 

Of Lost Home and Acceptance: Jammu and Kashmir

 

Of Lost Home and Acceptance

Some warm water, a pinch of tea leaves

I sit in her verandah, drenched in serenity.

 

Golden glow, she says, kahwah you are my dame,

Smiles and giggles, takes a sip from my vain.

 

She plucked a flower, put it in her hair.

Picked me up warm, leaned in her chair:

 

Maa had told her about the clashes today,

Deep thoughts, crescent forehead and shivery mane.

 

Papa, in evening had a helpless face,

He wrapped a hand around me, smile efface.

 

Next, I was packed into a wildered sack,

With others, the kettle and tea leaf bag.

 

When I saw light, the world was no more green.

Black and white, no coos and soft breeze.

 

She picked me up, cold. Put me in a drawer,

I sit here now, terrified in horror.

 

She has grown old now, it’s her 50 some birthday,

I got to see the light again, today.

 

A 20 year old, she runs in my memories,

Her 50 some face, blurs the imagery.

 

She let a tear out, picks me- her elf.

Now I sit & glare at blues, from her new shelf.

– Anonymous